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Follow your passion … within reason

Ann Loyola

Ann Loyola

We’ve all heard about Fashionistas and some of us may even have one in the family. These people are easy to identify because their need to wear the hippest trends always trumps what is sensible. Catching a flight? Wear gravity-defying heels. Skiing? Throw on a fur coat (faux or not). Grocery shopping? Gucci sunglasses and snakeskin gloves. Unless they fall off their heels and knock someone down, Fashionistas provide a harmless source of amusement.

On the other hand, Passionistas are getting on my nerves. We’ve all heard their seductive cajoling: “Find your passion” or “Chase your passion” or “Be passionate about your passion.” We’re further told that work isn’t work when you’re passionate about your work (huh?) and that we have the opportunity to pay passionate people a lot of freakin money to find out what we’re really passionate about.

Passion schmassion. Passion can be brilliant when first pursued and explored but with time it can lose its eyes and fluffy tail. (See The Velveteen Rabbit).  Don’t get me wrong. I believe in the pursuit of happiness and meaningful existence. It just seems to me that we’ve taken a good thing – passion – and turned it into yet another way to measure our shortcomings.

One-track passion can erode all too easily if the rest of the garden is left untended. This ubiquitous lecturing on passion should be expanded to include the surrounding soil in which we plant the bloom.

I consulted with global experts and among all of the well-intentioned, incredibly intelligent people that I found pontificating on Google, two people without college degrees and somewhat notorious pasts nailed it down for me.

Before I reveal this life-changing tip about passion, let me share some of the other messages I found:

  • Start the day early and end it late. If you’re sleeping, you’re wasting time.
  • Always have your passion on your mind. Always.
  • Surround yourself with your passionate work. Bring it home with you, too.
  • Don’t be polite. Be passionate (which apparently isn’t polite).
  • Be dedicated, hard-working, focused and willing to fail.
  • Talk about your passion and surround yourself with like-minded people.
  • Bore people with your passion.

I suppose there are little golden kernels in all of those tips along with an unhealthy dose of guilt-inducing mandates.  There should be some acknowledgement that a perpetual spring of motivation would have to nurture this flaming impolite passion. Or can we be allowed to accept that passions can rest, sleep, multiply or change over time and THAT’S OKAY.

In every case, there is one requirement for leading a sincerely passionate life.

Paul McCartney and John Lennon said it best. All you need is love.
Love your dog. Love your partner. Love the view of the Tetons. Love a breath of fresh crisp air. Love yourself, muffin top and all. Love is meant to be planted, shared, and spread. If you keep digging in the same spot, all you’ll get is a hole.

Hearts have a crazy capacity to beat and beat, on and on without much instruction from us. It’s only right that we repay such single-minded loyalty from a ball of muscle by opening our hearts to all of the beauty around us in a decidedly unsingle-minded way.

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Help us keep broken hearts beating

Ann Loyola

Ann Loyola

Do you prefer to have a heart that keeps beating? If not, keep surfing because what I have to say is of no interest to you.

Let’s get straight to the heart of the matter: warm-hearted people joined our Hospital Foundation campaign to raise over $38,000 for a new Zoll defibrillator for our local ambulance service. This is a vitally important unit to support emergency cardiac care. Thank you to everyone who helped us achieve this portion of our Keep it Beating fundraiser. You are truly and I don’t mean the candy.

If you have a soft spot in your heart for Emergency Rooms (and really, who doesn’t? Especially if you have young children) you can shore up your investment in life by donating toward the purchase of an additional cardiac monitor for our ER. Different from the Zoll defibrillator that rides in the ambulance, the cardiac monitor hums along right next to our ER patient, transmitting vitals to the central nurses’ station for continual supervision. It’s a good thing. It follows your heart, among other essential organs like lungs.

Our goal is to have this type of monitor next to each ER exam bed and we just need one more to reach the goal, so we’re coming to you with heart in hand. Consider making a donation of any amount to help us heal broken hearts.

Well, this is kind of a fun exercise using the word “heart” in multiple ways but if I go too far with this, you may get heartsick and exit in a heartbeat, which would be heartless of you.

Instead, open your heart and join in the kind of campaign that everyone with a heart should care about: Keep it Beating.

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CEO Viewpoint: From Better to Best

Keith Gnagey, CEO

Keith Gnagey, CEO

This is not your average healthcare CEO article. I won’t trot out numbers, stats and confusing lingo. I’ll only use the word “metrics” once, and instead of looking back, I’m going to tell you what Teton Valley Health Care plans to accomplish in 2015 as we work toward becoming the one of the best rural hospitals in the U.S.

In 2015, you can look forward to online access to your medical records, treatment plans and prescriptions through the implementation of our new patient portal. Through this portal, you’ll also be able to tell us how you’d prefer to receive messages, when you need prescription refills and reminders for follow-up care. Online payments and a review of your prior bills will also be available.

We’ll respond to your needs by adding services that make sense for our community. Currently, we can all benefit from 24/7 consultations with University of Utah Health Center stroke and burn specialists through our portable telemedicine robot. In the New Year, we’ll add tele-adolescent psychiatry and hopefully tele-oncology. We also want to add new clinic service lines, such as dermatology.

You’ll see interior changes in our clinics and hospital as we continue to press ahead with our design goal to reflect a healing environment for our patients, their families and friends. Changes will include a more natural design theme and room renovations that will make navigation easier for patients and providers.

We’re also determined to provide more services at a “one-price-covers-all” cost. This is difficult for hospitals because everybody is physically different and many times when a surgeon or physician has begun a procedure, other issues are discovered that need to be taken care of.  For now, you can check out our new bundled pricing for colonoscopies and upper GI screenings at tvhcare.org. We’ll add more of this type of pricing throughout 2015.

Similar to the saying that good things come in small packages, I believe that Teton Valley is fortunate to have a small hospital that offers impressive medical and nursing staff, round-the-clock emergency care, a menu of carefully selected services and technology that rivals or exceeds the capabilities available at some larger hospitals.  After giving numerous tours of our facility to outside hospital leaders, specialists and providers from large healthcare organizations, I’ve learned to anticipate their expressions of surprise and some envy when they see – for example – our X-ray and surgical suites, laboratory equipment and digital mammography room.

What services, changes and improvements do you want to see at your community hospital? Let us know by calling me at 354-6355, email info@tvhcare.org or comment on our Facebook page. TVHC tweets, pins, FBs and blogs, too, in an effort to continually offer access and information for everyone.  We invite you to be a part of moving TVHC from better to the very best.

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