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The doctors are in: Teton Valley Health Care contracts with Intermountain emergency physicians

A trip to the E.R. is never something to look forward to but if the need arises, be assured that you’re in good hands if you have to make a weekend visit to Teton Valley Hospital’s E.R. or Driggs Health Clinic. Teton Valley Health Care has contracted with Intermountain Emergency Physicians to provide physicians onsite 24/7 throughout the weekend. The doctors will also see patients during the Driggs clinic’s Saturday and Sunday business hours.

Intermountain Emergency Physicians, also known as IEP, is made up of 12 physicians with over 140 years of combined ER experience between them. IEP is based in Idaho Falls, currently serving Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, and now, Teton Valley Hospital. Some members of the group also work at Madison Memorial Hospital and Bingham Memorial Hospital. Eleven members of the group are currently board-certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine with one board eligible physician awaiting his certification notification.

Currently, Physician Assistants and Family Nurse Practitioners provide hospital ER care during weekdays in conjunction with TVHC physicians. For weekend coverage, TVHC had previously contracted ER care with a national staffing group. When it was time to renegotiate that agreement, CEO Keith Gnagey was pleased to discover a regional emergency care group.

“We already have a strong relationship with the IEP doctors through our shared patient care with EIRMC. These physicians know our valley, our facility and they’ve worked with our staff. All of this translates into great patient care,” said Gnagey.

When asked why Teton Valley Hospital needs to contract weekend ER coverage, Gnagey responded that TVHC would have to hire several additional doctors to be able to cover the weekend shifts and that the overall ER experience levels, EIRMC knowledge, and number of providers available through the relationship with IEP makes that a better alternative for providing care to our patients.

Dr. Eric Maughan, IEP physician, said he is “excited to be a part of this new agreement. Teton Valley Hospital is a great facility with excellent staff and impressive diagnostic capability. As physicians who were born and raised in Southeastern Idaho, we’re proud to be able to serve the community on a more local, personal level.”

For further information, please call Ann Loyola, director of Marketing and Public Relations at (208) 354-6301 or email aloyola@tvhcare.org.

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Doc Talk: The downside of toughing it out

By Dr. Mo Brown
Orthopedic surgeon

Mo Brown head shot

Dr. Maurice (Mo) Brown

I love taking care of the tough people who live in beautiful Teton Valley. If you live here, you are “tough”. This is not a sit-and-play-checkers-as-the-sun-goes-down kind of place. Our valley is full of tough people. They ski on torn ACLs, they board with broken tailbones, they sled with ripped rotator cuffs, they drive tractors with broken wrists and they go on with their work and recreation for years with these injuries. Really, I have to marvel at the pain these people must endure and the inventions they create to keep on moving.

If you think I’m writing about you, then please read on.

I admire your high pain threshold and your unwillingness to give up any time for rehabilitation because you’re having too much fun or have too much work to do. Just know this: It’s better for you and your orthopedic surgeon to have something to work with when you decide to get “it” fixed, whatever “it” may be.

Just know this: It’s better for you and your orthopedic surgeon to have something to work with when you decide to get “it” fixed, whatever “it” may be.

Orthopedists see X-rays and MRIs that tell the whole story in a few simple images and sometimes, it isn’t pretty.

A good example of long-term damage being the end product of ignoring an injury is a meniscus tear in a knee joint. It’s very common for me to see patients with a “torn and ignored” meniscus. The meniscus is designed to be a protector of the knee joint. But when torn, it becomes a defector and can destroy the joint’s surface cartilage. I see too many patients that have put off treatment because some days it feels fine and they can live with the popping and occasional pain. It’s a bummer to see the joint surface severely damaged when we finally get around to fixing the problem. If I can offer treatment soon after the injury, there is much less damage to the joint surface resulting in a quicker, better recovery and much better long term outlook.

In modern sports medicine we are generally more aggressive when it comes to early rehab. ACL patients start rehab right away — a big change from casting (eek!) and a year in rehab in the early days of ACL reconstruction. However, recent data regarding ankle sprains has led to a step back in how those injuries are managed. Instead of pushing immediate movement, it’s clear that a period of casting or boot immobilization produces better outcomes.

Again, I see lots of patients who ignore a bad ankle sprain and keep on truckin’. They sprain their ankle over and over and ultimately require surgery to reattach or reconstruct the ligaments.

Now, I’m not throwing stones here. I’m just as guilty of delaying treatment. But take my advice: if you get hurt, have it checked out. If you wait too long, what could have been a little R & R with physical therapy or maybe a minor surgical repair can morph into a more complex procedure such as joint replacement.

If you get hurt, have it checked out.

Orthopedics_Mo Brown

Mo Brown and patient

It’s important to know what the consequences can be if you put off medical help for injuries. You may be mentally able to handle physical pain, but your body is sending that pain signal for a reason.

For all of you die-hards out there, let me put it this way: The toughest thing you can do in these situations is to stop your activities, see your doctor and get “it” fixed before it becomes a bigger problem.

Dr. Mo Brown is an orthopedic surgeon at Driggs Health Clinic.

This article originally appeared in the Teton Valley News.

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TVHC website earns national recognition

TVHC website macbook mockupTeton Valley Health Care recently received a bronze level award from The Aster Awards for its website, tvhcare.org.

The Aster Awards, one of the largest national competitions of its kind, is hosted by Marketing Healthcare Today Magazine and Creative Images, Inc. This elite program recognized outstanding healthcare professionals for excellence in their advertising/marketing efforts for the calendar year 2014.

The 2015 Aster Awards received nearly 3,000 entries from across the United States as well as several foreign countries. All entries are judged by industry experts and are scored on multiple criteria with a possibility of 100 total points. Participant’s entries competed against similar-sized organizations in their specific groups and categories.

Awards were issued for entries that received top marks from judges placing them in the top 16% of the nation for advertising excellence. Judging criteria included creativity, layout and design, functionality, message effectiveness, production quality and overall appeal.

“The creativity of this year’s participating healthcare marketing professionals exceeded our expectations. The 2015 Aster Awards program contained some of the best and most creative advertising in the world,” said Melinda Lucas, Aster Awards program coordinator.

Teton Valley Health Care competed in the “Hospitals with under 75 beds” group, and earned a third place recognition among the website category’s 32 submissions.

All winners are posted on the Aster Awards website as well as published in Marketing Healthcare Today.

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