All Posts tagged teton valley health care

Ebola and Breast Cancer

Dr. George Linhardt Teton Valley Health Care

Dr. George Linhardt
Teton Valley Health Care

That caught your attention. To be clear, breast cancer does not lead to an Ebola infection nor does Ebola put you at increased risk for breast cancer. However, they share the importance of monitoring yourself and being vigilant to stay well.

With Ebola, if one has traveled to certain countries and develops symptoms, they need to seek medical attention to save their life.

With breast disease, if one detects a lump or a change, it is imperative to seek medical attention to save one’s life.

Men as well as women can develop breast cancer, so men should not ignore changes.

You know your body better than anyone else, so you will be the best to detect subtle changes or irregularities. These changes will not be detectable overnight, but may arise over a period of a month. It is recommended that a particular day of the month; 1st, 15th or last day of the month be your day for self-examination. For women, it is best to schedule your self-exam several days after the last day of your menstrual cycle. It will be easiest to detect changes at that time.

Breast self-examination is easily performed by you in the shower with a liquid soap. It is important to include the entire breast, the area beneath the breast and the armpit. One should be one alert for a bloody discharge, or a different discharge and changes in the skin of the nipple. These nipple changes may be a rash, scaling or an unusual skin tag. You can visit Teton Valley Health Care’s breast health information webpage for more information about self exams and general breast health. Teton Valley Hospital can also provide you additional information with diagrams to assist you.

Mammograms are an excellent partner for breast self-examination. This partnership is critical as approximately 15% of all breast cancers are not detectable by mammography. Current recommendations for mammograms begin at age 40 and at intervals of one to two years. If one waits until that age or the next mammogram to have a lump evaluated valuable time is lost, and options may radically change. Unfortunately, many are fearful of finding a lump or that if a lump is detected a biopsy will be necessary. The sooner one finds a cancer, the more options are available. Biopsies should not be feared. Today, most biopsies are performed under local anesthesia through a nick in the skin, with minimal discomfort and a tiny scar.

It is imperative that you do not ignore a potential change you may detect during a  self-exam, and that your provider listens to your concerns.

In breast cancer: earlier is better than later, smaller is better than larger, know and trust what you body tells you.

Dr. George Linhardt is a general surgeon at Teton Valley Health Care. He sees patients at Driggs and Victor Health Clinics. To make an appointment call (208) 354-2302.

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Help from afar: Teton Valley Hospital uses telemedicine to assist patients

Within the past few months, Teton Valley Hospital added telestroke and teleburn services offered through the University of Utah Health Care. The telemedicine program uses a tele-robot, which can be manipulated by the on-call doctor. The doctor appears on a screen where the robot’s “face” is and can communicate through the robot. This specific robot technology is compatible with the University of Utah, St. John’s Medical Center and Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center.

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