All Posts tagged teton valley hospital

Sport-related concussions: It’s not a game

As parents, we want to encourage our kids to be active, join teams, and learn discipline both on and off the
field. It’s also natural for us to worry about potential injuries that can come from participating in youth or
high school sports.

A main concern, both locally and nationally, is on concussions. How high is the risk? What are the signs?
How do we prevent them?

More

Hospital offers free service to help identify enterovirus

If you’re concerned that your child may be infected with enterovirus D68, Teton Valley Hospital is now offering free pulse-oximetry testing.

Pulse-oximetry tests can show whether or not an individual is able to breathe sufficient amounts of oxygen.  A key symptom of enterovirus D68 is a compromised respiratory system. Some children who contract this virus will require hospitalization or emergency care to support their oxygen intake.  Children who have asthma or allergies are particularly at risk.

Teton Valley Hospital wants to help identify enterovirus-related respiratory ailments before they become serious.  If your child has symptoms of a cold (runny nose, coughing) and you believe they may have contracted the virus, please bring your child to our hospital for a free quick, painless test.

If your child is suffering from a seriously compromised respiratory illness, it will be necessary to deliver further medical treatment.

Simply come to our hospital admissions area at any time of the day or night for a free pulse-oximetry test.  Meanwhile, we urge everyone to follow preventive care measures to reduce the impact of the virus.  Please note that pulse-oximetry tests cannot diagnose E-D68.

For more information on this free test, call Teton Valley Hospital at (208) 354-2383.

More

Enterovirus approaches Teton County

A contagious respiratory virus has been reported as the culprit creating illness in hundreds of children primarily in the Midwest.  Most recently making the news in Denver, Colo. where a spate of respiratory infections sent approximately 900 children to nearby clinics and hospitals, there are now reports of the virus possibly moving into Utah.

The official name of the virus is enterovirus D68 (EV-D68).  It spreads from person to person just like the common cold through coughing, sneezing and touching contaminated surfaces and it’s often mistaken for a bad cold with the exception of accompanying raised red rashes in some instances.  The virus tends to strike children and can cause severe respiratory problems especially among kids with asthma or allergies.

Similar to the common cold, there isn’t a cure or vaccine for EV-D68. Most cases will be mild and unpleasant with only severe complications requiring a trip to the clinic or a hospital stay.  No deaths have been reported and none are anticipated as a result of the enterovirus infection.  Parents are urged to seek immediate medical help if their child appears to have problems breathing.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the best methods for preventing EV-D68 include frequent, thorough hand washing, avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth and disinfection of frequently touched surfaces.

At this time, the CDC doesn’t know why this particular virus has made such a strong reappearance after decades of minor occurrences.

For further information, please visit www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/ or contact Teton Valley Hospital at (208) 354-6301. You can also see related information here.

More